Financial Services Tribunal & Pension Commission of Ontario Case Summaries/
Summaires des décisions du Tribunal des services financiers et de la Commission des régimes de retraite de l'Ontario

Case Name/nom du dossier:CAW-Canada and its Locals 112 and 673 v. Superintendent of Financial Services and Spar Aerospace Limited

Type/type:Pensions/Régime de retraite

Decision Date/Date de la décision:2007-01-19

Tribunal/tribunal:FST/TSF

 



Français

CAW-Canada and its Locals 112 and 673 v. Superintendent of Financial Services and Spar Aerospace Limited

Type: Pensions

Tribunal: FST

FST File No.: P0276-2006

Panel members: Elizabeth Shilton, Colin McNairn, Shiraz Bharmal

Parties to hearing: CAW and its Locals 112 and 673, Superintendent of Financial Services, Spar Aerospace Limited

Summary

The Financial Services Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) concluded that a determination by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Services (“OFSI”) as to whether a pension plan was federally regulated was not a bar to the Tribunal considering a similar issue. The decision indicates that the Tribunal is likely to closely scrutinize the determination of another tribunal, both in terms of the procedure employed by the other tribunal and the exact nature of the issue before the other tribunal, before the Tribunal will decline to hear a matter because it has already been determined by the other tribunal.

Background

The case concerns two pension plans (the “Plans”) whose members were represented by the Canadian Auto Workers (the “CAW”). The Plans had been registered with the Financial Services Commission of Ontario (“FSCO”) under the Pension Benefits Act (the “PBA”) from their inception in 1968. In January 2003, the employer sponsor for the Plans, Spar Aerospace Ltd. (“Spar”) requested that the registration of the Plans be transferred to the federal pension regulator – the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (“OSFI”). In January 2004, OSFI determined that the members of the Plans were employed in jobs which fell within the scope of the federal Pension Benefits Standards Act (“PBSA”). The conclusion was communicated to Spar and the FSCO but not to the CAW.

On February 6, 2006, the CAW requested that the Ontario Superintendent order a partial wind up of the plans under section 69 of the Ontario PBA. The CAW was advised by FSCO that the members of the Plans were subject to the requirements of the PBSA by virtue of the January 2004 decision of OSFI and, therefore, section 69 of the PBA was not applicable to the members affected by the downsizing.

The Plans were registered federally by OSFI issued certificates of registration for the Plans in August 2006. The CAW was excluded from OSFI’s decision making process as OSFI took the position that it was making an administrative decision based on information provided by Spar, and therefore consultation with other affected parties was not required.

In May of 2006, the CAW filed a hearing request with the Financial Services Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) seeking a partial wind up order.

Tribunal Ruling

The Superintendent and Spar took the position that OSFI’s decision that the Plans were under federal jurisdiction operated as a bar to any inquiry by the Tribunal into the CAW’s wind up request. In support of this argument the legal doctrines of issue estoppel, abuse of process and the rule against collateral attack were argued. In addition, Spar relied on the doctrine of lis pendens alibi in arguing that the CAW’s outstanding application before the Federal Court for judicial review of OSFI’s decision operated as a bar to the proceedings before the Tribunal.

In terms of the decision of OSFI from which the bar was argued to arise, the Superintendent and Spar argued that OSFI had concluded nearly two years prior to the CAW wind up request in 2006 that the Plans in question were under federal jurisdiction. The CAW, on the other hand, argued that OSFI did not make any decision until it actually registered the Plans, a decision reflected in the Certificates of Registration issued in August 2006. The Tribunal concluded that it did not have to make a choice between these two positions. Regardless of which OSFI decision the Tribunal focused on, the Tribunal was not persuaded that there was any bar to the proceedings before it.

On the merits of the issue estoppel argument, the Tribunal held that since the CAW was not afforded an opportunity to participate in the OSFI process, the parties to the OSFI decision were not the same as the parties before the Tribunal. In addition, the Tribunal held that the fact that the CAW might be held to be a party on judicial review to the Federal Court was not enough to establish a finding of issue estoppel. Even if the grounds for establishing issue estoppel were met, the Tribunal stated that it would have used its discretion to refuse to apply the estoppel doctrine. On the issue of possible conflicting decisions between the two regulatory authorities, the Tribunal held that the statutes contemplate that pension plans may overlap jurisdictions and the regulatory authorities have a long history of cooperation, therefore concerns regarding overlapping jurisdiction were exaggerated.

The Superintendent and Spar also argued that the rule against collateral attack prevented the CAW’s request for a partial wind up order under the PBA as this could require that the OSFI decision be disregarded, overruled or invalidated. The Tribunal held that the rule against collateral attack would not apply in this case as a partial wind up order would not operate to nullify the federal registration which occurred after the events giving rise to the wind up. The Tribunal concluded that the CAW was disputing the correctness of the OSFI decision but was not asking that the OSFI decision be quashed or set aside by the Tribunal.

The Superintendent and Spar argued that the abuse of process doctrine gives the courts discretion to relieve against unfair and oppressive re-litigation, despite the fact that the strict conditions for issue estoppel have not been established. The Tribunal did not find that the CAW’s February 2006 application for a partial wind up order could be characterized as an abuse of process. On that date the Plans at issue were provincially rather than federally registered. The Tribunal concluded that the CAW had made diligent efforts over a number of months to ascertain the status of Spar’s application and had been effectively ignored by OSFI. In these circumstances it was logical rather than unfair, for the CAW to approach the Superintendent for a partial wind up order.

The lis pendens alibi argument advanced by Spar focused on the relationship between the proceedings before the Tribunal and the outstanding application before the Federal Court for judicial review of the OSFI decision. The lis pendens alibi principle states that a court or tribunal should decline jurisdiction where there is a parallel proceeding in another court or tribunal. The Tribunal held that the matter before it was not a parallel proceeding as it was asked to consider a partial wind up of the Plans while the matter before the Federal Court was to consider the OSFI registration of the Plans. The Tribunal reasoned that a decision by the Federal Court on whether the Plans should have been registered federally may not address the question of whether the employees at issue in the wind up application were entitled to rights conferred by the PBA at the relevant time.

Cases cited: Boucher v. Stelco Inc., [2005] SCC 64, David Horgan and Superintendent of Financial Services, FST Decision No. P0063-1999-1, March 27, 2000, Pension Bulletin, 10/3, p.151, Maynard v. Ontario (Superintendent of Pensions) (2000), 23 C.C.P.B. 145, [2000] O.J. No. 881 (Div. Ct.); CUPE v. Ontario Hospital Association (1992) 91 D.L.R. (4th) 436 (Div. Ct.); Baxter v. Ontario (Superintendent of Financial Services (2004), 43 C.C.P.B. 1, [2004] O.J. No. 4909 (Div. Ct.), Danyluk v. Ainsworth Technologies Inc., [2001] 2 S.C.R. 460, Brosseau v. Superintendent of Financial Services, FST Decision No. PO183-2002-1, Pension Bulletin 13/1, Toronto (City) v. C.U.P.E., Local 79, [2003] 3 S.C.R. 77, Rocois Construction Inc. v. Québec Ready Mix Inc., [1990] 2 S.C.R. 440.

This summary is offered as a public service and should not relied upon as legal advice. Many factors unknown to us may affect the applicability of any statement or comment made in the summary to your particular circumstances.

Nom du dossier : TCA-Canada et ses sections locales 112 et 673 c. surintendant des services financiers et Spar Aerospace Limited

Type : Régimes de retraite

Tribunal : TSF

Dossier TSF no : P0276-2006

Membres du comité d’audition : Elizabeth Shilton, Colin McNairn, Shiraz Bharmal

Parties à l’audience : TCA et ses sections locales 112 et 673, surintendant des services financiers, Spar Aerospace Limited

Résumé

Le Tribunal des services financiers (le « Tribunal ») a conclu que la décision du Bureau du surintendant des services financiers (le « Bureau ») tranchant la question de savoir si un régime de retraite était ou non réglementé par le droit fédéral ne constituait pas une préclusion pour le Tribunal qui doit examiner une question semblable. Il ressort de la décision que le Tribunal va vraisemblablement examiner de près la décision d’un autre tribunal, autant sur le plan de la procédure suivie que de la nature exacte de la question qui a été portée devant cet autre tribunal, avant de refuser d’entendre une affaire au motif qu’elle a déjà été tranchée par l’autre tribunal.

Contexte

L’affaire concerne deux régimes de retraite (les « Régimes ») dont les participants étaient représentés par les Travailleurs et travailleuses canadien(ne)s de l'automobile (les « TCA »). Les Régimes avaient été enregistrés auprès de la Commission des services financiers de l’Ontario (la « CSFO ») en vertu de la Loi sur les régimes de retraite (la « LRR ») depuis leur création, en 1968. En janvier 2003, l’employeur répondant des régimes de retraite, Spar Aerospace Ltd. (« Spar »), a demandé de transférer l’enregistrement des Régimes à l’autorité fédérale de réglementation des régimes de retraite, le Bureau du surintendant des institutions financières (BSIF). En janvier 2004, le BSIF a jugé que les participants aux Régimes étaient employés dans des emplois qui tombaient sous le coup de la Loi sur les normes de prestation de pension du gouvernement fédéral (la « LNPP »). La décision a été communiquée à Spar et à la CSFO, mais pas aux TCA.

Le 6 février 2006, les TCA ont demandé au surintendant des services financiers de l’Ontario d’ordonner la liquidation partielle des Régimes en vertu de l’article 69 de la LRR de l’Ontario. La CSFO a informé les TCA qu’en vertu d’une décision du BSFI de janvier 2004 les participants aux Régimes étaient assujettis aux exigences de la LNPP et que par conséquent, l’article 69 ne s’appliquait pas aux participants visés par les mesures de réduction des effectifs.

Les Régimes ont été enregistrés selon le droit fédéral par le BSFI et les certificats d’enregistrement des Régimes ont été délivrés en août 2006. Les TCA ont été exclus du processus de prise de décision du BSFI car ce dernier estimait qu’il rendait une décision administrative en se fondant sur les renseignements fournis par Spar et qu’il n’était pas donc pas nécessaire de consulter les autres parties concernées.

En mai 2006, les TCA ont déposé une demande d’audience devant le Tribunal des services financiers (le « Tribunal ») afin d’obtenir une ordonnance de liquidation partielle.


Décision du Tribunal

Le surintendant et Spar ont plaidé que la décision du BSIF, selon laquelle les Régimes relevaient du droit fédéral, créait une préclusion empêchant le Tribunal de mener une enquête sur la demande de liquidation partielle déposée par les TCA. À l’appui de cet argument, ils ont fait valoir les principes de la préclusion découlant d’une question déjà tranchée (estoppel), l’abus de procédure et la règle interdisant les contestations indirectes. En outre, Spar s’est appuyé sur le principe de la litispendance (lis pendens alibi) pour soutenir que la demande de révision judiciaire, en instance devant la Cour fédérale, que les TCA ont déposée au sujet de la décision du BSIF d’enregistrer les Régimes, créait une préclusion par rapport à l’instance devant le Tribunal.

En ce qui concerne la décision du BSIF de laquelle découlerait la préclusion, le surintendant et Spar ont affirmé que le BSIF avait conclu, près de deux ans avant le dépôt de la demande de liquidation par les TCA en 2006, que les Régimes en question relevaient du droit fédéral. Les TCA, cependant, ont plaidé que le BSIF n’avait rendu sa décision qu’après avoir procédé à l’enregistrement des Régimes, décision dont témoignent les certificats d’enregistrement délivrés en août 2006. Le Tribunal a conclu qu’il n’avait pas à choisir entre ces deux positions. Le Tribunal n’était pas convaincu que l’une ou l’autre des décisions du BSIF créait une préclusion par rapport à l’instance devant lui.

Quant au bien-fondé de l’argument de la préclusion, le Tribunal a estimé que comme les TCA n’avaient pas eu la possibilité de participer à la prise de décision du BSIF, les parties à la décision prise par le BSIF n’étaient pas les mêmes que les parties se trouvant devant le Tribunal. Par ailleurs, le Tribunal a jugé que le fait que les TCA pourraient être partie à la révision judiciaire en instance devant la Cour fédérale n’était pas suffisant pour conclure à l’existence d’une préclusion. Même si les conditions préalables à l’application du principe de la préclusion étaient remplies, le Tribunal a expliqué qu’il aurait eu recours à son pouvoir discrétionnaire de refuser d’appliquer le principe de la préclusion. Pour ce qui est de l’argument de l’existence de décisions conflictuelles entre les deux autorités de réglementation, le Tribunal a estimé que les lois prévoient le cas de régimes de retraite qui relèvent de plus d’une juridiction et que les autorités de réglementation ont toujours su coopérer dans ces cas, rendant exagérée toute inquiétude à ce sujet.

Le surintendant et Spar ont aussi fait valoir que la règle interdisant les contestations indirectes empêchait les TCA de demander une ordonnance de liquidation partielle en vertu de la LRR au motif que si leur demande était acceptée, il faudrait nécessairement ignorer, annuler ou invalider la décision du BSIF. Le Tribunal a conclu que la règle interdisant les contestations indirectes ne s’appliquait pas en l’espèce parce qu’une ordonnance de liquidation partielle n’aurait pas pour effet d’annuler l’enregistrement fédéral qui a eu lieu après les événements qui ont donné lieu à la liquidation. Le Tribunal a estimé que les TCA contestaient la pertinence de la décision du BSIF mais sans demander au Tribunal de l’annuler.

Le surintendant et Spar ont soutenu que le principe de l’abus de procédure donnait aux tribunaux le pouvoir discrétionnaire d’empêcher la réouverture injuste et opprimante de litiges lorsque l’intérêt de la justice le justifiait, en dépit du fait que les conditions strictes de la préclusion découlant d’une question déjà tranchée n’étaient remplies. Le Tribunal n’a pas jugé que la demande d’ordonnance de liquidation partielle des TCA, datée de février 2006, constituait un abus de procédure. À cette date, les Régimes en question étaient enregistrés selon la règlementation provinciale, et non fédérale. Les TCA ont fait des efforts diligents, pendant plusieurs mois, pour savoir où en était la demande d’enregistrement déposée par Spar, efforts qui ont été ignorés par le BSIF. Dans ces circonstances, il était logique, plutôt qu’abusif, opprimant ou manifestement injuste, que les TCA s’adressent au surintendant pour demander une ordonnance de liquidation partielle.

L’argument de lis pendens alibi invoqué par Spar concernait la relation entre l’instance devant le Tribunal et la demande de révision judiciaire de la décision du BSIF en instance devant la Cour fédérale. Le principe de litispendance dispose qu’un tribunal, judiciaire ou administratif, devrait décliner compétence lorsqu’une instance parallèle est en cours devant un autre tribunal judiciaire ou administratif. Le Tribunal a estimé que l’affaire portée devant lui ne constituait pas une instance parallèle car il devait répondre à une demande de liquidation partielle des Régimes alors que l’affaire devant la Cour fédérale portait sur l’examen de l’enregistrement des Régimes par le BSIF. Une décision de la Cour fédérale tranchant la question de savoir si les Régimes auraient dû ou non être enregistrés selon le droit fédéral ne va pas forcément régler la question de savoir si les employés visés par la demande en l’espèce pouvaient invoquer les droits conférés par la LRR au moment pertinent.

Décisions citées : Boucher c. Stelco Inc., [2005] R.C.S 64, David Horgan et surintendant des services financiers, Décision TSF no P0063-1999-1, 27 mars 2000, Bulletin sur les régimes de retraite, 10/3, p.151, Maynard v. Ontario (Superintendent of Pensions) (2000), 23 C.C.P.B. 145, [2000] O.J. No. 881 (Div. Ct.); CUPE v. Ontario Hospital Association (1992) 91 D.L.R. (4th) 436 (Div. Ct.); Baxter v. Ontario (Superintendent of Financial Services (2004), 43 C.C.P.B. 1, [2004] O.J. No. 4909 (Div. Ct.), Danyluk v. Ainsworth Technologies Inc., [2001] 2 R.C.S. 460, Brosseau c. surintendant des services financiers, Décision TSF no PO183-2002-1, Bulletin sur les régimes de retraite 13/1, Toronto (City) v. C.U.P.E., Local 79, [2003] 3 R.C.S. 77, Rocois Construction Inc. v. Québec Ready Mix Inc., [1990] 2 R.C.S. 440.

Le présent résumé est offert à titre de service public. Il ne doit pas être interprété comme contenant des conseils juridiques. Un grand nombre de facteurs inconnus déterminent l’application des déclarations ou commentaires formulés dans le résumé à chaque situation personnelle.